I don't know. We all bring something of ourselves to whatever we choose to create. Our experiences certainly play a huge part in the creative process. We write what we know. We write what we believe.

If we fail to that, we are inauthentic to ourselves and our audience.

I don't believe that Tolkien was at all inauthentic. There are few writers who know the genre as he did; still fewer who could create not just a mythical/fantastical world but one complete with its own language.

At the end of the day, does it really make any difference if he avowed or disavowed being a Catholic or a Christian?

In any event, what Tolkien created has engaged, enthralled, and given enjoyment to countless people and multiple generations of readers.

Thanks for the read.

--

--

As always, you give us so many ideas for further meditation and consideration. The idea that "God wants to marry you" is beautifully illustrated in the Book of Osee in the Old Testament.

In beautiful literary prose, Osee tells us that his relationship with Gomer (a harlot whom God has told Osee to marry), is exactly like His relationship to His chosen people, Israel. God will long suffer our unfaithfulness until such a time as He chooses to draw us back.

We have a relationship with our body, a gift from God. How we treat it in many ways reflects how much we love God and appreciate what He has given us.

Thanks for the read!

--

--

Absolutely. I once heard the story about a person who complained so much about the cross he was given to carry that Our Lord took him to a large barn and told him that the barn was filled with other crosses; he was welcome to trade his for something else.

The person gleefully threw his cross aside and raced in only to find crosses of varying sizes and shapes, each imprinted with things like "cancer", "homelessness", "blindness", "abuses of all sorts".

In the end the person came out of the barn and picked up the cross Our Lord had given him.

St. Francis deSales wrote it more eloquently, but the result is the same. Carry your cross with patience, love, and joy.

Thanks for the read. Timely, as usual.

--

--

Everything that God created was good. It says so in Genesis. At the close of each day of creation, God looked on it and "saw that is was good."

All things created are good because God Himself is all good. He could not create anything that is bad; that would mean that God Himself would be imperfect.

So man, created in the image and likeness of God, cannot be intrinsically evil. That pesky thing called "free will" has been what has gotten the world into trouble.

A non-religious person can still make choices that are either good or bad. That is free will. An atheist can as well. I think the atheist chooses to believe that these choices come from themselves alone or from the society which structures human behavior to keep order among the people.

Thanks for the read and the insights.

--

--

Barbara Cleary

Barbara Cleary

Catholic wife/mom/Nan to three granddaughters. Living a dream in a multigenerational home, one day at a time.